DRAWING WITH A BIRO 1.


In my youth I favoured a biro over a graphite pencil. I’m not really sure why or even how this happened, but what it did teach me was to work quickly, confidently and learn how to cover my mistakes.

Today I rarely use an eraser when working in coloured pencil, and when I do it’s more for actual drawing with than for erasing (see my blog post on ‘Drawing with Erasers’).

I love the bold, clean lines that a biro makes. This also applies to fine tipped felt pens which are excellent to work with too.

Today I am featuring a series of drawings that I did on the Liffey Valley, in Northern Tasmania. The original  drawings were developed into a set of prints.

This type of work has an ‘etching’ appeal.

Have you tried drawing in biro?

One can work direct with clear, solid lines or build up layers of texture and detail with over-lapping lines or intense cross-hatching.

More next week.

Richard

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About artkleko

artist, art curator, art teacher, art judge, art critic
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4 Responses to DRAWING WITH A BIRO 1.

  1. Tomas says:

    I like these greatly. The applied technique and absence of color create the impression of some antiquity and thus make the landscapes talk about the eternal values. Such way the simple pictures look like the great symbols that as if awake the time… Your drawing please the eyes and touch the heart.
    Respectfully from Art by Tomas Thank you

  2. Phil Davis says:

    Hi Richard, I really like your pen sketches, or more accurately, paintings, they have an ethereal quality(hope thats the right word). Strangely I too have , in the last few weeks started using, almost exclusively, a black biro for sketching, and love the fact that you have to be brave and not worry about your mistakes.

    • artkleko says:

      Hi Phil, thanks for your comments. I agree with you that this type of drawing is ‘brave’, but at the same time I actually find it quite relaxing, because I’m not worried about making mistakes. Maybe we should apply that to all of our artistic endeavours!

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