ART IS A GREAT HEALER


healing-cream“Healing Cream”

83 x 148 cms

Prismacolor pencils on Canson pastel board. Own reference.

The therapeutic benefits of the art making process are recognised by all who practise the visual arts. Often it is the process of creation that gives one the greatest form of satisfaction; the product being a bonus. The use of art therapy in times of trauma or struggle can be a vital part of a person’s recovery. Engaging the mind, while promoting relaxation at the same time, the opportunity to deal with personal issues, makes art an important part of one’s recovery. Art is a great healer. A tube of paint has far greater value than its physical properties

Last night I saw a report on the tv news about a teenage girl who had turned her life around through art. It was a touching story and reminded me of the article I posted in May, 2014, about the therapeutic benefits of art.

Time and again we read of the benefits of art therapy in a broad range of situations involving people of all ages. Of particular note is the involvement of art in dementia research. I believe this has exciting possibilities for helping those seeking a cure, or at least slowing the onset of dementia. Art with very young children is a wonderful, often tactile experience. As a former high school and college art teacher, I saw what art did for my students. I not only remember many of those who excelled, but I can recall the ‘success stories’ where art made a huge difference in the lives and well-being of some of my students who struggled with a range of personal issues.

Those involved in the art industry know of the benefits of art practice. One doesn’t have to be an artist to reap the rewards of art. Why doesn’t our government think the same? Why is there less art taught in schools than ever before? Why has government funding for art been heavily reduced over the years? Are there any politicians with an understanding of the benefits of creativity to our society?

Surely the happiness and well-being of our society is more important than a budget surplus?

Richard

 

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About artkleko

artist, art curator, art teacher, art judge, art critic
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10 Responses to ART IS A GREAT HEALER

  1. The NSW School of Art has received massive cuts, a school synonymous to our art history.
    Public schools no longer receive the funding to teach art to the same degree as in the past.
    TAFE & Uni’s have had funding severely curtailed.
    Well beng has been linked to art.
    Depression on a massive rise.
    Too much reliance on instant gratification.

    • artkleko says:

      It’s all quite sad, Lynn. We need less ‘business barons’ as our leaders and more people in power who at least understand the benefits to society of the arts.

  2. Art has never taken a great place in school in France and it is very sad.

  3. Kate Bausch says:

    Bravo and Hear!! Hear!! I absolutely agree that art is healing and comforting therapy. Painting helped me process my grief after losing close family members and has continued to help me deal with PTSD after a car accident. Even simple doodling calms my anxious mind. However, why is it that I sometimes I gnash my teeth and worry and fret and foolishly spend a lot of energy ruminating, before I finally think about turning to my paint? Ha! I guess I need to work on that!

    • artkleko says:

      Thanks Kate for your comment. The art process is quite complicated in that it can be demanding as well as therapeutic. I’m glad you have benefited from art’s healing properties!

  4. Edna says:

    So right Richard! But our ‘leaders’ have such a $ driven mentality that if something doesn’t make money it is not worth supporting regardless of whether it is good for people or the environment.

  5. Pam says:

    I believe our Australian Govt are considering watering down funding for arts degrees as.. i heard a rumour that some politicians say they should get REAL degrees that get them work.

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